Critical Conversations at the College of Charleston on March 30, 2022 at 6:00 PM EST

Part of our Critical Conversations Series, featuring Polly Sheppard and Margaret Seidler. Moderated by Bernard Powers and Marjory Wentworth.

About this event

“Two Women Bridge the Racial Divide in a Civil Rights Journey” will be a fireside chat featuring Polly Sheppard, survivor of the Mother Emanuel AME shooting, and Margaret Seidler, a descendant of three generations of Charleston slave traders. Event will be held both live at the Rita Liddy Hollings Science Center Auditorium (58 Coming St, Charleston, SC 29401) and streamed online.

Registration Information

Awakening the Ancestors!

Awakening the Ancestors!

Join us for a free, live performance of the traditional music of the Gullah Geechee people of the South Carolina Lowcountry. During our time together, we’ll provide music and historical education about ancestral music. Learn about the styles, meaning, and purpose of the Lowcountry spirituals and discuss them with the museum and our co-hosts at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church – North Charleston, SC!

There will be a special performance by the Geechee Gullah Ring Shouters at 3:45 pm!

Program begins at 4:30 p.m.

Date: Saturday, March 18, 2022
Time: 3:45 p.m.

Presented in partnership by the International African American Museum, Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, and the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission. Free and open to the public. All ages.

SCAN to register for this event or visit www.iaammuseum.org/awakening2022.
This is a hybrid event, please plan to attend in-person or virtually!

“Brothers Speak: Reflections on Black Women” Sponsored by the Dr. Edna B. McKenzie branch of ASALH on March 12, 2022 at 11AM

March is Women’s History Month, and on Saturday, March 12, 2022, from 11:00AM to 1:00PM, the Dr. Edna B. McKenzie branch of ASALH presents, “Brothers Speak: Reflections on Black Women”.

The topics of the discussion are the importance of family support and mentorship in public office; the effects of religion on public service and community discussion; the impact of social policies on family structure and education; and mental health-counseling resources.  Hear from Black men and women who share their insight on the best practices of leadership, advocacy, and community development to improve the lives of our children. This promises to be an exciting and informative event! 

This powerful panel discussion will be moderated by Dr. Kathy Humphrey, President of Carlow University and will feature:

  • Russell and Kathy Bynums (Bynums Marketing and Communications, Inc)
  • Rev. Dr. B. De Neice  and Rev. Dr. John C. Welch (Bidwell Street United Presbyterian Church |  Sixth Mount Zion Baptist Church)
  • Rev. Edward and Lavonia Bailey (Bethel AME Church, Lancaster PA)
  • Linda Sturdivant, MEd, LPC, CEAP (Sturdivant & Associates)
  • Dr. Stephanie Myers (Black Women for Positive Change | R.J. Myers Publishing & Consulting Co.)

Registration

 

March 12, 2022 CHS ASALH Branch Meeting at 1pm EST

March is Women’s History Month

We honor these Past Presidents of the Charleston Area Branch of ASALH for their service and dedicated commitment to the teaching, promoting , researching, and preserving the African American experience

  • Dena Davis
  • Julia Ellen Davis
  • Regina Williams
  • Julie Monroe (deceased)

MEMBERSHIP MEETIG DETAILS

DATE: MARCH 12, 2022

TIME: 1:00 – 3:00 PM

MEETING ID :897 6309 8253

PASSCODE: 483225

AGENDA

Call to Order

Lift Every Voice and Sing

Treasurer’s Report

President’s Comments and Updates

Review of Member Benefits

Presentation: Charleston Equity Story Map– Amber Johnson, Director Office of Equity, Inclusion and Racial Conciliation, City of Charleston, SC

Announcements

Celebrate Black History Month with the CHARLESTON LITERARY FESTIVAL

CELEBRATE BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH TIYA MILES’S AWARD-WINNING BOOK AND RELIVE HER SESSION AT CHARLESTON LITERARY FESTIVAL 2021

In 1850s Charleston, Rose, an enslaved woman, was facing an impossible situation. Her nine-year-old daughter Ashley was to be separated from her through forcible sale in South Carolina’s slave market. In a gesture of motherly love, she packed a small sack containing basic provisions for Ashley to carry with her.

Harvard historian Tiya Miles’s National Book Award-winning work, All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, A Black Family Keepsake evokes the story behind this sack and its legacy. This artifact is not just a story of forced separation, loss, and generational love; it also tells us about enslaved black women’s methods of survival.

In conversation with Kameelah Martin at the Charleston Literary Festival 2021, Tiya Miles says, “Ashley’s sack shows us that black women’s history is real, it is rich, and we can access it if only we listen to black women’s stories.”

This Black History Month, you can view this powerful conversation between Tiya Miles and Kameelah Martin, Dean of the Graduate School at the College of Charleston on YouTube, HERE.

You can also purchase a copy of All That She Carried from Buxton Books or via Bookshop.

Anson Street African Burial Ground Project Reanimation on Feb 26, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM EST

Join our community-advised conversation so that we can continue to serve you through our research and interpretation initiatives!

Time & Location

Feb 26, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Cannon Street Arts Center, 134 Cannon St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

About the Event

As we continue the work we began with the Gullah society, we want to sit with community members who have consistently supported us and entrusted us with sharing the lives of the Anson Street Ancestors to ask you to direct our work. At this event, La’Sheia Oubré and Joanna Gilmore host the Community Conversation in person at Cannon Street, while Dr. Raquel Fleskes and Dr. Theodore Schurr will join via Zoom.  Raquel and Theodore will be providing an update about the full genomic DNA research and the dental calculus research, which will help us to learn more about the Ancestors’ diet and health.  We will also discuss plans for a permanent memorial for the Ancestors.  Artwork inspired by the Ancestors and created by children and community members will also be on display.

RSVP

Black History Month: Resisting Slavery – Special Screening and Q&A With Smithsonian Curators

Over the past year, Smithsonian readers like you have joined us for virtual live events. Together, we have explored the nation’s history, its triumphs as well as its failings. In our next event, we are turning our attention to powerful stories of resistance—moments when enslaved people acted in defiance—that represent an essential chapter in American history.

Join us for a unique online event featuring a discussion with Smithsonian scholars as well as segments of the just-released Smithsonian Channel documentary series, “One Thousand Years of Slavery.” You’ll gain historical insights from Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture curators Mary Elliott and Paul Gardullo. You’ll also view clips from the television series, which was executive produced by Courtney B. Vance and Angela Bassett, and field producer Najma Nuriddin will share behind-the-scenes perspective on how the documentary came together.

You’ll also have a chance to ask your own questions about these vitally important parts of the history of slavery in a Q&A; CBS News correspondent Errol Barnett will moderate the conversation and pose your queries to our panel of experts.

For Black History Month, join us online on Monday, February 28, at 7 p.m. EST for an evening filled with learning and history.

Register/Buy Tickets

A recording of this presentation will be available to ticketholders via email after the event and will be accessible for on-demand viewing for one week.

Book talk and signing at The Citadel with Lahnice Hollister

Book talk and signing

Wednesday, March 2
6:30 p.m.
Daniel Library
Free, open to the public

Events honoring Black History Month continue with a book talk and signing on Wednesday, March 2.

The Citadel will host Lahnice McFall Hollister at 6:30 p.m. in Daniel Library.

Hollister, a genealogist and family historian, has published research in national genealogical journals and has received numerous awards for her publications.

Her book talk will focus on her most recent publication: “Resisting Jim Crow: The Autobiography of Dr. John McFall.” McFall was among Charleston’s early Black pharmacists and was the brother of Hollister’s grandfather. Hollister has received critical acclaim from scholars for uncovering this previously unknown manuscript by one of Charleston’s African American healthcare pioneers.

This event is open to all members of the campus community, but space is limited. To register, click here.

CHS Area Branch of ASALH Does Black History Month-February 2022

Calendar of Events

Feburary 1-28 ASALH 2022 Black History Month Virtual Festival  (register at www.asalh.org)

February 1- Charleston County Council Resolution Recognizing 2022 Black History Month

February 7- “Black History Talks” Radio Program Hosted by Dr. Bernard Powers on WOHM 96.3 FM at 12 noon

February 9- Charleston City Council Meeting- Third and Final Reading on the Ordinance to Establish a Standing Committee on Human Affairs and Racial Conciliation)

Feb 12 – “Black People Do Therapy”

Feb13- Avery Love Basketball Game College of Charleston

Feb 20-Miseducation of the Negro Book Study Part I – with College of Charleston 1967 Scholars

February 24- Charleston County School Board Black Educators Affinity Group Workshop

Resources

ASALH 2022 Black History Month Theme Books, Websites and other Historical Materials and Guides

TV and Movie Schedule for Networks and Streamers

SC Department of Education Black History Month Calendar

Celebrate Black History Month with the Charleston County Library

Black and Indigenous Art in Charleston

Griots of Cotton, Indigo, & Clay debuts the permanent collection of the Acres of Ancestry Initiative/Black Agrarian Fund, an evolution of the advocacy efforts of the Black Belt Justice Center. Curated by Torreah “Cookie” Washington, and featuring over 100 pieces of artwork commissioned from Black fiber artists in the South Carolina Lowcountry, the Black Belt South, and the African Diaspora at large, this vast array of textile art portrays the power of the Black imagination to extend beyond colonial frameworks, centering narratives of self-sustained land ownership and spirit-cultural reclamation.

Inspired by the movement for restoration of eco-cultural traditional practices, Griots of Cotton, Indigo, & Clay showcases the rich tradition of fiber art as material culture and tells the untold stories of struggle and resilience rooted in black ecocultural traditions and textile arts. The artworks of over four dozen seasoned artisans will be on view, including works by the artists of The Return of the Bees Collective. The collected artworks examine the ideals of racial pride, social power, identity, and the importance of land, heritage, and culture.

States exhibiting artist and curator Cookie Washington, “Black fiber artisans uphold the charge of griots, weaving together narratives of resistance into tactile expressions of land memory and visions for the future.” This traveling exhibition explores the innovations of eco-cultural techniques in appliqué, basket-weaving, collage, indigo, and painting, celebrating an ecosystem of over 50 master fiber artists, ceramicists, sweetgrass preservers, and blacksmiths.

This exhibition is generously supported by the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, Estelle Colored Glass, Lady Farmer, the Kalliopeia Foundation, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee.

The installation will be on view Thursdays through Sundays from noon to 5pm starting January 17 and closing February 27, 2022 at City Gallery.

Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice (January 21, 2022 – August 7, 2022)

William H. Johnson painted his Fighters for Freedom series in the mid-1940s as a tribute to African American activists, scientists, teachers, and performers as well as international heads of state working to bring peace to the world. He celebrated their accomplishments even as he acknowledged the realities of racism, violence, and oppression they faced and overcame. Some of his Fighters—Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver, Marian Anderson, and Mahatma Gandhi—are familiar historical figures; others are less well-known individuals whose determination and sacrifice have been eclipsed over time. Drawn entirely from the collection of more than 1,000 works by Johnson given to the Smithsonian American Art Museum by the Harmon Foundation in 1967, this exhibition is the first-ever presentation of this series in Johnson’s home state of South Carolina.

Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with generous support from Art Bridges, Faye and Robert Davidson, and the Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation.

The presentation of this exhibition at the Gibbes is made possible through the generous support of the Wayne and Carolyn Jones Charitable Foundation, with additional support from Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina, Jane Smith Turner Foundation, Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, South Carolina Arts Commission, and the Gibbes Women’s Council.

Dyani White Hawk HEAR HER at Halsey Gallery (JANUARY 14 – FEBRUARY 26, 2022)

Dyani White Hawk’s work illuminates the lived experiences of Native Peoples. With her video, photography, and works in other media, she aims to use the language of visual art to bring light to the deep chasm between our understanding of history and the truth. Her work weaves together forms from the canon of Western art along with the visual languages and traditions of Native people. In doing so, her work spotlights Native women, whose strength and fortitude through centuries of colonization have helped their peoples’ languages and cultures to survive.

On view in Hear Her, White Hawk’s video installation LISTEN presents a series of Native women speaking the language of their people. Each film takes place on the land of each participant’s nation, and viewers hear the respective languages without translation. As such, White Hawk puts a focus not only on the resonance of each speaker, but she also reveals society’s collective ignorance of the people, culture, and language of those native to the land on which we live. Chapter 1 of LISTEN features eight videos and White Hawk plans to continue the series to include 24 videos. The Halsey Institute commissioned White Hawk to create a video to honor the Catawba Nation, located in South Carolina.

White Hawk’s photography installation I Am Your Relative confronts the gross stereotypes and distorted caricatures that dehumanize and commodify Native women. This installation, along with LISTEN, helps White Hawk shine a light on the misrepresentation of Native Peoples while reinforcing the fact that we are all connected as human beings.

Dyani White Hawk: Hear Her is sponsored in part by South Carolina Humanities, a not-for-profit organization; inspiring, engaging and enriching South Carolinians with programs on literature, history, culture and heritage. This exhibition is also supported by the Center for Sustainable Development at the College of Charleston, which provides students with the opportunities and resources to engage in our community sustainably.