April 10, 2021: Branch Meeting and Panel on Promoting Health and Wellness

Program Title: The Black Family-Promoting Health and Wellness

Date: April 10, 2021 via Zoom

Time: Membership Meeting at 1pm; Program at 1:50pm

Description

Membership meeting to be followed by a panel discussion

The Covid-19 pandemic has refocused and reinforced attention on the existence of health disparities for Black Americans. Our panel of health care providers will explore the family based issues, strategies, and actions that impact health and wellness outcomes.

Panelists

  • Thaddeus J. Bell, MD, Closing the Gap in Health Care, Inc.
    • Dr. Thaddeus J. Bell is a practicing Family Practice Physician in Charleston, South Carolina. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Family Medicine and the Founder of Closing the Gap in Health Care, Inc. (CGHC), a non-profit organization created to decrease health disparities by providing health education for African Americans and other under-served populations. Closing the Gap in Health Care radio health tips as well as the website  has received  National Awards from the National Health Foundation as one the best programs of its kind in the Country in 2009, 2010 and 2011.
  • Paula Orr, MD, Charleston Women’s Wellness Center
    • As board-certified GYN, Dr. Paula Orr brings more than 20 years of extensive experience in every aspect of women’s care. Specializing in Gynecology, Minimally Invasive Pelvic Surgery, Advance Gynecologic Laparoscopic Surgery, to alternative medicine and preventative medicine to treat many gynecological ailments, you will find the experience and care that you need. In addition, Dr. Orr and her staff work to treat the total woman, Body, Mind and Spirit. That’s why you will find a relaxing, motivational, and caring environment inside our practice.

Moderator

  • Gwendolyn Harris, PhD, Charleston Branch Program Committee

Registration

Sistahs in Indigo: A Conversation with Arianne King Comer and Ifé Franklin

The African American Studies Program at the College of Charleston, in conjunction with Avery Research Center and the Gibbes Museum of Art, will host their annual artists’ lecture event: Sistahs in Indigo: A Conversation with Arianne King Comer and Ifé Franklin.

Join us for an insightful conversation between two indigo-making artists about the ancestral craft of indigo-dying and its connection to the Lowcountry. Arianne King Comer is Artist-in-Residence at the Gibbs Museum and will be joined in conversation by fellow artist and master dyer, Ifé Franklin. Erica Veal, Project Archivist and Interpretation Specialist at Avery Research Center, will moderate the conversation.

The virtual event will take place on Saturday, March 20, 2021 at 11am EST. You will not need to register to attend the event; we will stream the event on the Avery Research Center’s Youtube page (https://tinyurl.com/IndigoSistahs).

Join ASALH Festival Marquee Event, Back by Popular Demand


Greetings!

Back by popular demand, ASALH presents an encore viewing of A Conversation with Henry Louis Gates and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham on Friday, March 26 at 4 pm (est). Don’t miss this March marquee festival event replay!


ASALH guests who purchased the premier showing on February 20, 2021 can view the encore performance at no additional charge.

If you missed it, you can get a ticket here

Other festival. Events can be viewed on ASALH TV via YouTube.

See the festival souvenir journal here

NMAAHC’s MAKING AFRICAN AMERICA: A Virtual Symposium on Immigration and the Changing Dynamics of Blackness (March 5 – 20)

The Making African America symposium brings together scholars, journalists, activists, curators, filmmakers and writers to discuss how immigration has shaped and is continuing to reshape what it means to be black in the United States.

Explore the program and register here

Deep Blue : An Indigo Exhibition exhibition at the Public Works Art Center (Summerville, SC) from March 6 to April 16

Opening Saturday: “Deep Blue: An Indigo Exhibition” features eleven indigo artists from across the Lowcountry and beyond, including Kibibi Ajanku, Kristy Bishop, Arianne King Comer, Kelly Fort, Dale Fort, Ifé Franklin, Caroline Harper, Heather Powers, Marion Scott Readett, Pam Shanley, and Mary Young, Each artist individually explores their connections to the historically significant plant, sharing works of art that summon stories and encourage introspection. Programming will accompany this show throughout its run, including a streaming of the documentary film “Blue Alchemy: Stories of Indigo” by Mary Lance, off-site excursions to a local indigo farm, shibori classes, outdoor indigo workshops, and more. This show runs March 6-April 16 in the East Gallery at Public Works Art Center, and the official reception will be Thursday, March 18 from 6pm-8:30pm. *There will be a virtual offering of this exhibition in the way of a professional video presentation. Stay tuned!*

Summit Series Finale with Mehrsa Baradaran: The Color of Money and the History of Black Banks

Wed, Mar 10, 2021 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM EST

The Color of Money author and professor Mehrsa Baradaran will discuss the history of Black banking in America. Her keynote address will connect the origins of Black banking with the oppressive policies that created today’s racial wealth gap. The second half of the finale will feature a discussion focused on South Carolina communities as seen through the lens of Baradaran’s work. Join the conversation by purchasing the book through Turning Page Bookshop, a Black-owned independent bookstore in Goose Creek, SC.

Register using this link https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/3066453676193502476

Black History Month Art Exhibit on February 27th at the St. Julian Devine Community Center

Exhibit is a partnership between Charleston Black Lives Matter, Eastside Community Development Center, and City of Charleston Recreational Department on February 27th at 3pm EST. Come view art work of Charleston County’s middle school and high school students in celebration of Black History Month! Mask Required.

Register here (free).

February 13th Branch Event: Preserving the Black Family through Records

Join the archival staff at the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture for a discussion on the role of archivists and archives in preserving family histories

When: Saturday, February 13, 2021 via Zoom

Time: 1:00 p.m. EST

Sponsored by the Charleston Area Branch of ASALH and the Charleston Freedom School

Event is free and open to the public

Register

Please use the form below to register for the event or click the link here

College of Charleston’s Department of History Inaugural Black History Month Lecture: Feb. 16, 2021

Please join the Department of History at CofC in welcoming Dr. Douglas Flowe for its inaugural Black History Month Lecture. Dr. Flowe’s lecture is entitled, “Uncontrollable Blackness: African American Men and Criminality in Jim Crow New York.”

Due to current Covid-19 restrictions, this lecture and Q&A will be held online on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 5pm EST. Please register by Feb. 15th here:

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/black-history-month-lecture-dr-douglas-flowe-on-uncontrollable-blackness-tickets-135911146899?fbclid=IwAR1IN8KFpnR8kN-gXbwU7QYzfpF0RvPcd-PjC2Km6p5-HVWwuSNGa72p3EY

Carolina-Barbados Connection Symposium, November 13th and 14th

This fall marks 350 years of the historical connection between Carolina and Barbados, representing migration from Barbados and the beginning of slavery in Carolina. This symposium will commemorate this connection by exploring the historical and contemporary connections between Barbados and the Carolinas.

Join the Institute for African American Research for a virtual symposium on the rich history that connects the island of Barbados and the Carolinas. The African presence in what became South Carolina dates back to the 1500s and their arrival with early Spanish explorers. In 1670, when English settlers migrating from the island of Barbados established a settlement at Charles Towne, people of African descent began arriving via the island shortly thereafter. By the year’s end, almost 30 people of African descent could be found living among about 170 Europeans and thousands of Native Americans. To learn more about the beginnings of this connection and how it has developed to the present day for Gullah Geechee folks in the Carolinas to Barbados, join and hear from scholars presenting from the Caribbean to East Coast.



Registration for Day 1: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_VfIHMbq6STWv-NWsQfXz_Q

Registration for Day 2: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_QknDt94ISM-TH24D40-N_w