25th Year of the Charleston Middle Passage Remembrance Ceremony

Date: June 11, 2022

Time: 9AM

Where: Fort Moultrie, Sullivan’s Island (1214 Middle St, Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482)

Who: Everyone, Program is open to the Public

About Ceremony

REMEMBRANCE COMMEMORATION 2022

Charleston, South Carolina

On Saturday June 11, 2022 from 9:00am – 1:00pm EST, the Charleston Area Branch Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Remembrance Committee hosts REMEMBRANCE COMMEMORATION 2022

The Libation Ceremony at 12:00 Noon EST, officiated by Yoruba Priestess OsunWonuola EfunLayo pays homage to African Ancestors.

The annual commemoration provides an opportunity for members of the African-descended community to collectively remember the millions of Africans — men, women, and children, who were sold, kidnapped, shipped away from their homeland, and who died along the route from Africa to the Americas. By remembering, we honor and restore the humanity of the nameless faceless Ancestors, disrupt the collective amnesia, and continue the process of healing from the fear, pain, guilt and shame of the experience that continues to traumatize the African descended community. Additionally, we seek the restoration of cultural identity, dignity and pride.

REMEMBRANCE programs (aka Tribute to the Ancestors) are conducted in various National and International locations. All people of African heritage are strongly encouraged participate. For information visit our Facebook page.

IF WE DON’T REMEMBER AND HONOR THEM – WHO WILL!

25th year y’all!!! It began as and remains a dynamic community collective sharing in REMEMBRANCE, COMMEMORATION, TRIBUTE, HEALING.

To prepare for this year’s program we encourage you to check out these resources

Resources

National Parks Service

This first one is regarding the “African Passages” exhibition at the National Parks Service: Fort Moultrie.  The Avery Research Center and the The Charleston REMEMBRANCE Committee as a unit was happy to offer support to this NPS-Fort Moultrie’s permanent exhibition honoring the Lowcountry African presence and story. The Charleston Remembrance Committee is acknowledged: (paragraph 2, last sentence)

And most certainly the ritual at the opening of the exhibition followed our format –>Drumming & Libation. (last paragraph)

Charleston Middle Passage Remembrance (YouTube Channel)

  • Access the interviews that were conducted in 2020 and 2021.
  • 2021 Virtual Remembrance Program.
    • Included are the portions recorded at the Avery Research Center with Dr. Tamara Butler; Charleston Branch ASALH President, Mr. Jerome Harris; Charleston Branch ASALH/Remembrance Committee Representatives Ms. Regina Williams, Ms. Dena Davis.
    • Included is memorable footage of Dr. Ade Ofunniyin (RIP), Dr. Myrtle Glascoe (RIP), Mr. James Campbell (RIP), Julie Saunders Monroe (RIP), Hardy Babatu Robinson (RIP), the Libation Ceremony conducted by Iya Osunwonuola (aka Mama Pearl) — and so much more!
    • This video compilation was put together by Charleston Remembrance’s videographer/documentarian Brenda Peart.  It was widely shared & viewed locally, nationally, internationally.
  • This is a dynamic interview with Charleston born Doktor Khozmiq.
    • Doktor Khozmiq was born in Charleston, SC and resides in Columbia, SC, is an experienced practitioner in the African Diasporic tradition known as African American Folk Magic – Conjure, Hoodoo and Rootwork. His practice, Cosmic Alchemy, offers a platform to heal, teach, and empower using the spiritual technology of the Ancestors.
    • Interview conducted by Jonathan Richardson w/assistance from Quanza Washington, Talim Lessane, Deborah Wright. Filmed by Brenda Peart.

Social Media Accounts

Instagram

Facebook

May 2022 CHS Area Branch Program: Public Institutions, Pharmacists and Physicians: Racial Inequities in Healthcare in South Carolina, 1790-1950

EVENT: Charleston Area Branch ASALH Membership Meeting and Program

DATE: MAY 14, 2022 1-3PM

LOCATION: Virtual via Zoom

DESCRIPTION; Branch Meeting and Panel Presentation

TITLE: “Public Institutions, Pharmacists and Physicians: Racial Inequities in Healthcare in South Carolina, 1790-1950”

PRESENTATION DESCRIPTION

This interdisciplinary panel will address health disparities by race in 18th, 19th and 20th century South Carolina utilizing diverse research methodologies in uncovering the deeply troubled yet important history of racial inequities in health care in South Carolina. Presenters will: examine the essential role of enslaved workers in America’s first public orphanage explore the life and career of Dr. John McFarland during the late nineteenth through the twentieth centuries and; discuss the reach  history of African American medical institutions and the paucity of official records in archival repositories.

PRESENTERS

Dr. Felice Knight, Assistant Professor History Department, The Citadel

Dr. Brian Fors, Curator Waring Historical Library, MUSC

Lahnice McFall Hollister, Independent Scholar and Genealogist

PROGRAM AGENDA

1:00    Welcome and Call to Order and Lift Every Voice and Sing

1:10    Officers / Committee Reports

1:45    Panel Presentation

2:15    Q&A

2:30    Announcements

REGISTER HERE

Author Talk: A Conversation with Dr. Maxine Smith-Every Thursday starting April 21 at 5:30 p.m.

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Maxine Smith on her book The Midnight Mayor of Charleston (The Henry Smith Story). Like the book and told in six chapters, this discussion series will take place at six different branches with each location mirroring a different chapter and featuring appearances from leaders and members of the community. Space will be limited. Call your branch to register for this event today!

Social Determinants of Black Health and Wellness on April 9, 2022 at 1pm EST

The Charleston Area Branch of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is hosting a series of programs focusing on Black health and wellness in honor of National Minority Health Month.

Join us for an interactive virtual forum as we define the social factors that impact health and ways we can actively improve health and wellness outcomes for the Black community. Featured panelists are a trio of local healthcare leaders to include Dr. Michael Moxley, Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Health Equity Officer at Roper St. Francis Healthcare; Renee Linyard-Gary, Director of Health at Trident United Way; and Dr. Thaddeus J. Bell, Primary Care Physician, Founder of Closing the Gap in Healthcare and renowned community health activist. Program will be hosted by Kimberly Butler Willis, Managing Director of GOODSTOCK Consulting.

Registration

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

Awakening the Ancestors!

Awakening the Ancestors!

Join us for a free, live performance of the traditional music of the Gullah Geechee people of the South Carolina Lowcountry. During our time together, we’ll provide music and historical education about ancestral music. Learn about the styles, meaning, and purpose of the Lowcountry spirituals and discuss them with the museum and our co-hosts at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church – North Charleston, SC!

There will be a special performance by the Geechee Gullah Ring Shouters at 3:45 pm!

Program begins at 4:30 p.m.

Date: Saturday, March 18, 2022
Time: 3:45 p.m.

Presented in partnership by the International African American Museum, Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, and the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission. Free and open to the public. All ages.

SCAN to register for this event or visit www.iaammuseum.org/awakening2022.
This is a hybrid event, please plan to attend in-person or virtually!

Celebrate Black History Month with the CHARLESTON LITERARY FESTIVAL

CELEBRATE BLACK HISTORY MONTH WITH TIYA MILES’S AWARD-WINNING BOOK AND RELIVE HER SESSION AT CHARLESTON LITERARY FESTIVAL 2021

In 1850s Charleston, Rose, an enslaved woman, was facing an impossible situation. Her nine-year-old daughter Ashley was to be separated from her through forcible sale in South Carolina’s slave market. In a gesture of motherly love, she packed a small sack containing basic provisions for Ashley to carry with her.

Harvard historian Tiya Miles’s National Book Award-winning work, All That She Carried: The Journey of Ashley’s Sack, A Black Family Keepsake evokes the story behind this sack and its legacy. This artifact is not just a story of forced separation, loss, and generational love; it also tells us about enslaved black women’s methods of survival.

In conversation with Kameelah Martin at the Charleston Literary Festival 2021, Tiya Miles says, “Ashley’s sack shows us that black women’s history is real, it is rich, and we can access it if only we listen to black women’s stories.”

This Black History Month, you can view this powerful conversation between Tiya Miles and Kameelah Martin, Dean of the Graduate School at the College of Charleston on YouTube, HERE.

You can also purchase a copy of All That She Carried from Buxton Books or via Bookshop.

Ukweli: Searching for Healing Truth

Ukweli is the Swahili word for truth. This book meets this moment in America as a healing truth to overcome the trauma of slavery and the decades of violence that followed it. The personal accounts and insights from forty-five writers and poets will educate White Americans about the systematic racial bias employed to stymie African American progress.

Ukweli provides insight into the struggles Black people have faced as they’ve made substantial contributions to America, and helped to define its soul. It shows a part of American history often overlooked or misunderstood. Inspired by a poetry, lecture, and dialogue series of the same name organized by poet Horace Mungin in 2020 at Charleston’s McLeod Plantation.

Ukweli, Searching for Healing Truth: Hakim Abdul-Ali • Marcus Amaker • Kim Nesta Archung • Steve Bailey • William P. Baldwin • Al Black • James M. Brailsford III • Millicent E. Brown • Vicki Callahan • Karen Chandler • Portia E. Cobb • Tim Conroy • Sara Makeba Daise • Heather L. Hodges • Damon Fordham • Adrienne Troy Frazier • Herb Frazier • Savannah J. Frierson • Shawn Halifax • Jonathan Haupt • Stephen G. Hoffius • Gloria Holmes • Josephine Humphreys  • Gary Jackson • DeMett E. Jenkins  • Marnishia Jenkins-Tate • Patricia Bligen Jones  • Ed Madden • Susan Madison • Joseph McGill Jr. • Ray McManus • Karen Meadows • Kennae Miller • Horace Mungin • Porchia Moore • Yvette R. Murray • Hampton R. Olfus Jr. • Adam Parker • Bernard E. Powers Jr. • Elizabeth Robin • Aïda Rogers • Margaret Seidler • Teresa Speight • Jennie L. Stephens • Kieran “Kerry” Taylor • Ronda Taylor • LaTisha Vaughn • Marjory Wentworth • Ernest L. Wiggins • Treva Williams

Anson Street African Burial Ground Project Reanimation on Feb 26, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM EST

Join our community-advised conversation so that we can continue to serve you through our research and interpretation initiatives!

Time & Location

Feb 26, 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

Cannon Street Arts Center, 134 Cannon St, Charleston, SC 29403, USA

About the Event

As we continue the work we began with the Gullah society, we want to sit with community members who have consistently supported us and entrusted us with sharing the lives of the Anson Street Ancestors to ask you to direct our work. At this event, La’Sheia Oubré and Joanna Gilmore host the Community Conversation in person at Cannon Street, while Dr. Raquel Fleskes and Dr. Theodore Schurr will join via Zoom.  Raquel and Theodore will be providing an update about the full genomic DNA research and the dental calculus research, which will help us to learn more about the Ancestors’ diet and health.  We will also discuss plans for a permanent memorial for the Ancestors.  Artwork inspired by the Ancestors and created by children and community members will also be on display.

RSVP

Tribute to Liz Alston by Donald West

Liz Alston, educator, historian and Emanuel AME church historiographer passed away on Saturday, February 19, 2022 . She was also once chair of the Charleston County School board. Liz was one of the early advocates for teaching black history in the school system. As an adjunct instructor at Trident Technical College, she was the first to teach black history classes at the college. I had my many experiences and memories of Liz, including our trip to Senegal and The Gambia in 2018. RIP Liz, your pioneering efforts and legacy are well established.

Tribute written by and photos provided by Donald West, CHS Area Branch of ASALH Co-Historian

Black and Indigenous Art in Charleston

Griots of Cotton, Indigo, & Clay debuts the permanent collection of the Acres of Ancestry Initiative/Black Agrarian Fund, an evolution of the advocacy efforts of the Black Belt Justice Center. Curated by Torreah “Cookie” Washington, and featuring over 100 pieces of artwork commissioned from Black fiber artists in the South Carolina Lowcountry, the Black Belt South, and the African Diaspora at large, this vast array of textile art portrays the power of the Black imagination to extend beyond colonial frameworks, centering narratives of self-sustained land ownership and spirit-cultural reclamation.

Inspired by the movement for restoration of eco-cultural traditional practices, Griots of Cotton, Indigo, & Clay showcases the rich tradition of fiber art as material culture and tells the untold stories of struggle and resilience rooted in black ecocultural traditions and textile arts. The artworks of over four dozen seasoned artisans will be on view, including works by the artists of The Return of the Bees Collective. The collected artworks examine the ideals of racial pride, social power, identity, and the importance of land, heritage, and culture.

States exhibiting artist and curator Cookie Washington, “Black fiber artisans uphold the charge of griots, weaving together narratives of resistance into tactile expressions of land memory and visions for the future.” This traveling exhibition explores the innovations of eco-cultural techniques in appliqué, basket-weaving, collage, indigo, and painting, celebrating an ecosystem of over 50 master fiber artists, ceramicists, sweetgrass preservers, and blacksmiths.

This exhibition is generously supported by the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, Estelle Colored Glass, Lady Farmer, the Kalliopeia Foundation, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, and the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee.

The installation will be on view Thursdays through Sundays from noon to 5pm starting January 17 and closing February 27, 2022 at City Gallery.

Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice (January 21, 2022 – August 7, 2022)

William H. Johnson painted his Fighters for Freedom series in the mid-1940s as a tribute to African American activists, scientists, teachers, and performers as well as international heads of state working to bring peace to the world. He celebrated their accomplishments even as he acknowledged the realities of racism, violence, and oppression they faced and overcame. Some of his Fighters—Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver, Marian Anderson, and Mahatma Gandhi—are familiar historical figures; others are less well-known individuals whose determination and sacrifice have been eclipsed over time. Drawn entirely from the collection of more than 1,000 works by Johnson given to the Smithsonian American Art Museum by the Harmon Foundation in 1967, this exhibition is the first-ever presentation of this series in Johnson’s home state of South Carolina.

Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with generous support from Art Bridges, Faye and Robert Davidson, and the Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation.

The presentation of this exhibition at the Gibbes is made possible through the generous support of the Wayne and Carolyn Jones Charitable Foundation, with additional support from Blue Cross Blue Shield of South Carolina, Jane Smith Turner Foundation, Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, South Carolina Arts Commission, and the Gibbes Women’s Council.

Dyani White Hawk HEAR HER at Halsey Gallery (JANUARY 14 – FEBRUARY 26, 2022)

Dyani White Hawk’s work illuminates the lived experiences of Native Peoples. With her video, photography, and works in other media, she aims to use the language of visual art to bring light to the deep chasm between our understanding of history and the truth. Her work weaves together forms from the canon of Western art along with the visual languages and traditions of Native people. In doing so, her work spotlights Native women, whose strength and fortitude through centuries of colonization have helped their peoples’ languages and cultures to survive.

On view in Hear Her, White Hawk’s video installation LISTEN presents a series of Native women speaking the language of their people. Each film takes place on the land of each participant’s nation, and viewers hear the respective languages without translation. As such, White Hawk puts a focus not only on the resonance of each speaker, but she also reveals society’s collective ignorance of the people, culture, and language of those native to the land on which we live. Chapter 1 of LISTEN features eight videos and White Hawk plans to continue the series to include 24 videos. The Halsey Institute commissioned White Hawk to create a video to honor the Catawba Nation, located in South Carolina.

White Hawk’s photography installation I Am Your Relative confronts the gross stereotypes and distorted caricatures that dehumanize and commodify Native women. This installation, along with LISTEN, helps White Hawk shine a light on the misrepresentation of Native Peoples while reinforcing the fact that we are all connected as human beings.

Dyani White Hawk: Hear Her is sponsored in part by South Carolina Humanities, a not-for-profit organization; inspiring, engaging and enriching South Carolinians with programs on literature, history, culture and heritage. This exhibition is also supported by the Center for Sustainable Development at the College of Charleston, which provides students with the opportunities and resources to engage in our community sustainably.