Author Talk: A Conversation with Dr. Maxine Smith-Every Thursday starting April 21 at 5:30 p.m.

Join us for a conversation with Dr. Maxine Smith on her book The Midnight Mayor of Charleston (The Henry Smith Story). Like the book and told in six chapters, this discussion series will take place at six different branches with each location mirroring a different chapter and featuring appearances from leaders and members of the community. Space will be limited. Call your branch to register for this event today!

Ukweli: Searching for Healing Truth

Ukweli is the Swahili word for truth. This book meets this moment in America as a healing truth to overcome the trauma of slavery and the decades of violence that followed it. The personal accounts and insights from forty-five writers and poets will educate White Americans about the systematic racial bias employed to stymie African American progress.

Ukweli provides insight into the struggles Black people have faced as they’ve made substantial contributions to America, and helped to define its soul. It shows a part of American history often overlooked or misunderstood. Inspired by a poetry, lecture, and dialogue series of the same name organized by poet Horace Mungin in 2020 at Charleston’s McLeod Plantation.

Ukweli, Searching for Healing Truth: Hakim Abdul-Ali • Marcus Amaker • Kim Nesta Archung • Steve Bailey • William P. Baldwin • Al Black • James M. Brailsford III • Millicent E. Brown • Vicki Callahan • Karen Chandler • Portia E. Cobb • Tim Conroy • Sara Makeba Daise • Heather L. Hodges • Damon Fordham • Adrienne Troy Frazier • Herb Frazier • Savannah J. Frierson • Shawn Halifax • Jonathan Haupt • Stephen G. Hoffius • Gloria Holmes • Josephine Humphreys  • Gary Jackson • DeMett E. Jenkins  • Marnishia Jenkins-Tate • Patricia Bligen Jones  • Ed Madden • Susan Madison • Joseph McGill Jr. • Ray McManus • Karen Meadows • Kennae Miller • Horace Mungin • Porchia Moore • Yvette R. Murray • Hampton R. Olfus Jr. • Adam Parker • Bernard E. Powers Jr. • Elizabeth Robin • Aïda Rogers • Margaret Seidler • Teresa Speight • Jennie L. Stephens • Kieran “Kerry” Taylor • Ronda Taylor • LaTisha Vaughn • Marjory Wentworth • Ernest L. Wiggins • Treva Williams

Book talk and signing at The Citadel with Lahnice Hollister

Book talk and signing

Wednesday, March 2
6:30 p.m.
Daniel Library
Free, open to the public

Events honoring Black History Month continue with a book talk and signing on Wednesday, March 2.

The Citadel will host Lahnice McFall Hollister at 6:30 p.m. in Daniel Library.

Hollister, a genealogist and family historian, has published research in national genealogical journals and has received numerous awards for her publications.

Her book talk will focus on her most recent publication: “Resisting Jim Crow: The Autobiography of Dr. John McFall.” McFall was among Charleston’s early Black pharmacists and was the brother of Hollister’s grandfather. Hollister has received critical acclaim from scholars for uncovering this previously unknown manuscript by one of Charleston’s African American healthcare pioneers.

This event is open to all members of the campus community, but space is limited. To register, click here.

Tribute to Liz Alston by Donald West

Liz Alston, educator, historian and Emanuel AME church historiographer passed away on Saturday, February 19, 2022 . She was also once chair of the Charleston County School board. Liz was one of the early advocates for teaching black history in the school system. As an adjunct instructor at Trident Technical College, she was the first to teach black history classes at the college. I had my many experiences and memories of Liz, including our trip to Senegal and The Gambia in 2018. RIP Liz, your pioneering efforts and legacy are well established.

Tribute written by and photos provided by Donald West, CHS Area Branch of ASALH Co-Historian

Charleston Area Branch of ASALH’s former president’s ancestors honored

In October 2021, Charleston Area Branch of ASALH members Julia-Ellen Davis and Vicki Davis Williams visited London, England, to commemorate the blue English Heritage plaque for William and Ellen Craft. During this visit, they were able to for the first time meet face-to-face their British cousins and this meeting is depicted in the image above. All of the individuals are the great, great grandchildren of Ellen and William Craft.

While in London, CBS News-CBS Saturday Morning and British Sky News interviewed Julia-Ellen and Vicki regarding their ancestors, Ellen and William Craft. The CBS Saturday Morning segment aired
in the United States on October 23rd. The interview with Julia-Ellen and her British cousin discussed the importance of London’s historic Blue plaque, which commemorated the work of William and Ellen as abolitionists in the 1800s in Great Britain.

London’s famous blue plaques link the people of the past with the buildings of the present. Now run by English Heritage, the London blue plaques was started in 1866 and is thought to be the oldest of its kind in the world.

You can find out more about the history of the Craft’s at the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture, where the family has an archival collection and/or view a selection of items digitally on the Lowcountry Digital Library (LCDL) . Additionally, you can read their autobiography, Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom, online here.

Presentation of Woodson’s books to the Charleston County Public Library (CCPL)

New Book Alert: 101 African Americans Who Shaped South Carolina edited by Dr. Bernard Powers

Dr. Bernard Powers talks his new book 101 African Americans Who Shaped South Carolina, the new International African American Museum, & spiked eggnog at library parties with Curtis Rogers for South Carolina State Library’s LibraryVoicesSC podcast!

🎙listen: bit.ly/3ginBsE
📖book: bit.ly/2GLXoFm