CHS ASALH Black History Month Program on Feb. 11, 2023 at 1pm EST

Title

Branch Meeting and Black History Month Forum

Date and Time

February 11, 2023, 1-3 pm

Sponsor

Charleston Area Branch ASALH

Location

Riley Center for Livable Communities: 176 Lockwood Drive, Charleston 29403. (virtual link TBD)

Description

The program addresses the Black History Month theme “Black Resistance”

Efforts to repress the teaching of Black history in the United States have a long history. Ironically as we celebrate Black History Month we find ourselves engaged in a highly charged public debate around this very issue. We invite you to join us and a panel of scholars, teachers, parents and activist to engage in a conversation on the issues, proposals, opportunities and strategies that are part of today’s struggle on the national, state and local levels.

Panelists

Agenda

  • Welcome
  • Lift Every Voice and Sing
  • Officers’ Comments
  • Black Resistance – The Fight Over Black History Forum
  • Announcements
  • Affirmations

RSVP

Colour of Music and Branch Member only Reception

Charleston Branch members are invited to celebrate the 10th Anniversary of the Colour of Music Festival founded in Charleston SC by Lee Pringle, the Artistic Director. Over the four days the festival presents a diverse classical repertoire of baroque, classical and 20th century music featuring classically trained musicians of African descent. ASALH members are invited to a reception celebrating the tenth anniversary and honoring Lonnie Hamilton III, musician, educator, community leader who was the first African American to serve on the Charleston County Council.

The reception will be held on Saturday, February 4 at 6pm prior to the festival finale. Information will be provided on the branch website.

Festival Schedule

About Festival

The Colour of Music Festival, Inc. presents a diverse classical repertoire of baroque, classical and 20th-century music at the highest of musical standards to diverse audiences nationally. The festival has presented in Atlanta, Georgia; Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina; Nashville, Tennessee; Houston; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Richmond, Virginia; Washington, D.C.; Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Sacramento, California.

Few classical music enthusiasts are aware of the tremendous contributions of Le Chevalier de Saint-Georges, an African-French composer whose opera and classical masterpieces equaled or far exceeded those of his 18th-century contemporaries. Although his compositions are highly recognized overseas, they have gathered little notice in the United States. Today there are thousands of celebrated and prodigiously talented classical principals, composers and performers of African descent throughout the world. Yet, their opportunities to grace concert stages of major American orchestras are rare to non-existent. The Colour of Music Festival’s mission is reversing this trend.

Since 2013, the Colour of Music Festival offers a musical kaleidoscope highlighting the impact and historical significance of black classical composers and performers on American and world culture. The Colour of Music Festival began with performances at various venues throughout historic Charleston, South Carolina and has grown to debut in cities across the country with artists from across the globe.

Assembling acclaimed black chamber ensemble players and artists to form the Colour of Music Orchestra, the Festival showcases some of the top black classical musicians in the United States, trained at some of the most prestigious music schools, conservatories and universities in the world.

REVISED DATE: Branch Meeting and Forum: January 21, 2023 at 1 p.m. EST

Date

Saturday, Jan 21, 2023 (was formerly the 14th)

Time

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Location

Riley Center for Livable Communities (178 Lockwood Dr, Charleston, SC 29403)

Description

The first membership meeting of the year will include a review of branch activities in 2022 and the presentation of the 2023 projected calendar. This will be followed by a community forum on Black Resistance History, Life and Culture – Making Connections. Participants will be asked to share ideas on how we can best explore the history of the struggle of Black Americans ‘to establish and maintain safe spaces, where Black life can be sustained, fortified and respected. Organizations are asked to share information on their programs and projects that can contribute to this year long focus on the topic of Black Resistance in its many forms

RSVP using the form below

2023 Charleston’s Black Ink Festival

Black Ink: A Charleston African American Book Festival is the first and only annual celebration of African American literature in the Charleston area. Black Ink serves as a platform to support local Black writers, creating a space for them to share their work, discuss their craft, and expose readers of all ages to the great variety of African-American authors in the area. With the support of community-conscious sponsors Black Ink: A Charleston African American Book Festival will impact the lives of hundreds of readers of all ages

Find out more

A Memorial for the Ancestors

Over the coming months, La’Sheia Oubré and Joanna Gilmore will be working to engage community members in the process of creating the memorial. They will identify individuals in the African American community who match the demographic profiles of the thirty-six Ancestors to provide models for the hands of the Ancestors. The hands of the selected individuals will be moulded in alginate (a natural substance) and later cast in bronze and then attached to the basin. The Ancestors included infants, children, teenagers, and adult women and men.

How can I get involved?

We are looking for people to volunteer who match the demographic profiles of the Ancestors to have their hands cast. Volunteers will be asked to meet with Stephen Hayes for the molding of their hands between February 16 and 18, 2023.

Oubré and Gilmore will also work with individuals, churches and organizations to collect soil from African descendant burial grounds in Charleston. The collected soil will be used in the fabrication of the basin to symbolize the many enslaved and free Africans who lived, toiled and were buried in the earth upon which our city is built.

If you know of a particular burial ground or your church or family members are connected to a sacred burial ground and you would like to collect soil to be used in the memorial design please contact us.

To register your interest in serving as a hand model or to volunteer to collect soil from a burial ground that is meaningful for you or your community, please click the link below

Find out more