African History/Maryland History/ South Carolina History – $500 Award – Global Journey Scholar Contest Students Eligible to Apply through Monday September 20, 2021

Mission:

The Global Journey Scholars Program encourages students to explore African history throughout the year.  We highlight the vast contributions and influence of Africans and Africans born in America and other countries who have been instrumental in contributing to society and humanity.    All students in grades 5-12 are eligible to apply.

To pay homage to Kunta Kinte and the many ancestors who shared a similar journey during the MAAFA, the August /September Global Journey Scholar will prepare works that examine the importance of remembering history through names. 

Today, in the state of Maryland, there is a township in Prince George’s County called “Mitchellville, Maryland”.  But did you know that in 1862, a township called Mitchelville was formed in South Carolina?  Names have always been important to African, Gullah and American traditions.  It is a way to remain connected to memories and energy of significant people (i.e., ancestors), important events and historical places.  Many cities, states and countries are currently in the midst of ensuring equity in the recognition, remembrance and celebration of the contributions of people of African descent.

Global Journey Scholar Contest: 

Find out more about the two townships called Mitchelville.  

Compare Mitchellville, MD and Mitchelville, SC.  What are the similarities between the two townships and populations?  How are the two townships different? 

PROJECTS:

1.  Immerse yourself in being a journalist.  Using the 5 W’s (who, what , when, where, and why) conduct research to find out and report on how Mitchelville SC was established. Remember that it is important to use multiple sources and verify your sources of information.  To share your findings, you may create a timeline, research report, creative visual artwork or video that showcases how the Gullah people of West African descent residing in Mitchelville, SC persevered, maintained and demonstrated West African culture and traditions when they created their own community in SC. 

2.  Immerse yourself in being an architect.  Design your vision of what the next Mitchellville city or town might look like in the future.  What might you and your team of engineers, construction workers, city planners and other members of the project team consider as your  begin the design project.  Think about the current design of Mitchellville, Maryland.  What are some considerations that would be important to you and future generations who would live there to foster healthy communities that serves the needs of the citizens of the future.  For example, if you had control of city planning, where would you place residential communities?  What style of communities would you have?  How would you build environmental sustainability into your city model?   How would you ensure that you have the proper infrastructure for transportation, public health and educational systems?  What role would animal rights play? Where would potentially displaced animals be relocated to in your design?

Due to COVID-19, the Global Journey Scholars Award portion will be virtual.  Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival will announce the winner live at the event and a recording will be posted to the Kunta Kinte Heritage Festival  and Global Journey for Children websites and social media.

All submissions are due September 20, 2021 by 11:39PM EST. 

Criteria and eligibility guidelines are available on the Global Journey Scholars Page on the website.

Note Date Change: Join us on July 17th at 1pm for The Black Family: Worship Traditions and Faith Institutions

PROGRAM TITLE: The Black Family: Worship Traditions and Faith Institutions

DATE AND TIME: Saturday, July 17, 2021, 1-3PM EST via Zoom

SPONSORS: Charleston Area Branch of ASALH

DESCRIPTION:  Worship traditions and faith institutions are a significant historic element of African American life and culture. This forum will explore the rich diversity of these traditions and institutions with a focus on their roles and impact on the Black family.

MODERATOR: Dennis Muhammad, Esq.

PRESENTERS:

Lee Bennett, Historian, Mother Emmanuel AME Church

Rev. DeMett Jenkins, Lilly Director of Education and Engagement for Faith Based Communities, International African American Museum

Kathleen Merritt, Director, Office of Ethnic Ministries, Roman Catholic Diocese of Charleston

Register

Online Event on June 26th at 12pm: The Black Family: United by History, Restored by Storytelling

Join the Association for the Study of African American Life and History for our project launch on June 26th with insightful presentations by Tracey Artis from Black Family Reunion and Therese Nelson of Black Culinary History. Through this launch event, we hope to inspire families to reconnect and reemerge whole through archiving, storytelling, and breaking bread guided by both our live and pre-recorded sessions.

In continuing this year’s theme, “The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity,” the Association for the Study of African American Life and History is excited to announce a new national campaign, “The Black Family: United by History, Restored by Storytelling.” Launching in collaboration with NY Life and Archival Alchemy®, the campaign encourages participants to host intergenerational Black family reunions—virtual or in person—to explore their unique African American heritage and family History.

“The Black Family: United by History, Restored by Storytelling” will include prerecorded workshops, Q&A sessions, panel discussions, and a certificate program to guide participants through tools of oral storytelling, genealogy, and familial archiving that may serve as a roadmap to their reunions, after a year apart.

Celebrate Juneteenth in the Lowcountry

There are several opportunities to celebrate the Juneteenth holiday in the Lowcountry. Check out the individual events below.

This festival is open to all cultures, but will specifically target the national African American community and seek to galvanize the rising awareness, popularity and pride in celebrating the Juneteenth holiday. During this event, and as a sobering reflection of Charleston serving as the number one slave port sending enslaved people to various destinations, “All roads lead to Charleston, SC”

We will tap into the richness of the history, culture and flavor of The Lowcountry. This event will be branded as a yearly destination for the celebration of the Juneteenth holiday!
Celebrating Juneteenth in Charleston, South Carolina as a large-scale event is significant to our heritage and who we are as a people. Originating in Galveston, Texas, Juneteenth is now celebrated throughout the United States annually on the 19th of June, with varying official recognition. Juneteenth pays tribute and celebrates the journey to freedom, the contributions, ingenuity, and sacrifices that were made by those who came before us. Charleston has an abundantly rich black history due to its Gullah Geechee roots and because nearly half of enslaved Africans (Afrikans) brought to America came through Charleston, and nearly 80 percent of African-Americans can potentially trace an ancestor who arrived in Charleston. Juneteenth is a pivotal milestone in African American history. It demonstrates the long, enduring fight for freedom. It took nearly two and half years for those who were enslaved, in the westernmost Confederate state of Texas to finally be free from enslavement when the Union soldiers arrived, many of whom were black, to enforce the 1863 Emancipation Proclamation (Delaware and Kentucky, would not come until several months later, on December 18th, 1865 through the Thirteenth Amendment).
“Juneteenth” also referred to as Freedom Day or Liberation Day is the longest running African American Holiday celebrating the emancipation of African Americans who had been enslaved in the United States. Through Lowcountry Juneteenth Week and Festival, we aim to magnify an often overlooked moment in African American history. Join us June 14th – June 20th as we empower, celebrate and educate thru Gullah History, arts and culture.
Juneteenth Week will highlight black owned business with curated events throughout the city. The festival will include a family day of fun on Saturday June 19th at The Bend, a breathtaking waterfront venue located in beautiful North Charleston. The family affair will feature children’s activities, food trucks, vendors, performances, live concert, firework finale and more.
Juneteenth Pride Celebration sponsored by Charleston Black Pride

Updated information on the 2021 Middle Passage Remembrance Ceremony


REMEMBRANCE COMMEMORATION 2021
Charleston, South Carolina

On Saturday June 12, 2021 from 10:00am – 2:00pm EST, the Charleston Area Branch Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) Remembrance Committee hosts Virtual REMEMBRANCE 2021.

Included in the program, a welcome by Mr. Jerome Harris, President, Charleston Area Branch ASALH, the program Occasion by Ms. Dena Davis, the Charleston Branch Historian and special greetings from the Charleston Branch Remembrance Committee Chairperson, Ms. Regina Williams. Dr. Tamara T. Butler, Executive Director of the College of Charleston’s Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture will be featured in an interview format. The Libation Ceremony at 12:00 Noon EST, officiated by Yoruba Priestess OsunWonuola EfunLayo pays homage to African Ancestors. Other features include historic footage recorded by Videographer Brenda J. Peart with memorable moments from past Charleston Remembrance Programs, and footage from the Diaspora showcasing the continuity of culture. “Connecting the dots across the Diaspora!”

The annual commemoration provides an opportunity for members of the African-descended community to collectively remember the millions of Africans — men, women, and children, who were sold, kidnapped, shipped away from their homeland, and who died along the route from Africa to the Americas. By remembering, we honor and restore the humanity of the nameless faceless Ancestors, disrupt the collective amnesia, and continue the process of healing from the fear, pain, guilt and shame of the experience that continues to traumatize the African descended community. Additionally, we seek the restoration of cultural identity, dignity and pride.

REMEMBRANCE programs (aka Tribute to the Ancestors) are conducted in various National and International locations. All people of African heritage are strongly encouraged participate. For information visit our Facebook page.
IF WE DON’T REMEMBER AND HONOR THEM – WHO WILL!

Join us Saturday June 12, 2021, 10:00 am – 2:00pm on Facebook LIVE: Charleston Middle Passage Remembrance
https://www.facebook.com/CHSRemembrance

YouTube LIVE: Charleston Middle Passage Remembrance
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnovs_BoB7SeeI2e19v5OXg


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REMEMBRANCE Inspiration: “All those Africans in the briny deep. All those people who said ‘no’ and jumped ship. All those people who tried to figure a way to steer, to navigate amongst the sharks. We don’t call upon that power… upon those spirits. We don’t celebrate those ancestors. We don’t have a marker, an expression, a song that we use to acknowledge them. We have nothing to indicate that those are our people and they mattered … we don’t tap into the ancestral presence in the waters.” ––Toni Cade Bambara (1987)

“Spirit of the Dead, rise up and claim your story.” ––Introduction to the film “Sankofa” (1993)

“If the Atlantic were to dry up, it would reveal a scattered pathway of human bones, African bones marking the various routes of the Middle Passage.” ––Dr. John Henrik Clarke’s introduction to “The Middle Passage: Black Ships/White Cargo” by Tom Feelings (1995)


The Charleston Remembrance Program is a sponsored by:
Charleston Branch ASALH Remembrance Committee

May 8, 2021: The Black Family and the Intergenerational Transfer of Wealth

PROGRAM TITLE

The Black Family and the Intergenerational Transfer of Wealth

DATE and TIME

May 8, 2021 1:00 PM-3:00 PM EST

SPONSORS

CHS Area Branch ASALH and Charleston Freedom School

DESCRIPTION

The forum explores the historic and contemporary factors contributing to the persistence of the massive Black/white wealth gap and the intergenerational consequences on the family. Programs and strategies for reducing the gap will be discussed. Narratives of success in achieving intergenerational transfers will be shared.

PRESENTERS

AGENDA

  • Call to Order
  • Lift Every Voice and Sing
  • President’s Comments
  • Forum
  • Announcements

Register